Dreams of Reality

Maybe someday I'll sleep

0 notes

Even though it’s just Wednesday I’ve had a crazy week, so I’m rewarding myself with breakfast for dinner. And that is French toast made with cinnamon raisin bread, I am in heaven.

Even though it’s just Wednesday I’ve had a crazy week, so I’m rewarding myself with breakfast for dinner. And that is French toast made with cinnamon raisin bread, I am in heaven.

Filed under food

274,812 notes

magic-bowtie-dreams-221b:

thempress:

People look down on McDonald’s employees but fail to realize that if all these folks left McDonald’s and pursued “better careers”  your ass wouldn’t be able to get a McDouble with an Oreo McFlurry at 3am. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

You can’t demand a service while simultaneously degrading those who provide it for you. 

(via whereinthewarehouse)

1 note

Oh lord I had two exams today and I was convinced I was going to fail both of them, but one just posted the scores online and I got a 95.5%, and on the other there was only one question I was unsure of and I’m pretty sure I got even that one right and just oh my god I’m so relieved

Filed under ems learns ems stresses

53 notes

ecoslo:

Gemstone Quilt: Finished!

I am pleased to report that I finished the gemstone quilt this weekend! 

I’m happy with how it’s turned out. I learned a few new sewing/quilting skills along the way - foundation paper piecing and curved piecing - that I know I’ll be using a lot again.

This quilt is *just about* ready to go to its new home, after one addition that I’ll post soon!

Quilty details:

  • * Approximately 55” x 60” finished size
  • * Gemstones from a foundation paper piecing pattern from Sarah Sharp of {no} hats in the house; pieced into a quilt top of my own design
  • * Quilt top, back and binding made entirely of Kona cotton solids in 16 shades (that I got in a "sea spectrum" bundle) of blue and 2 shades of grey (Shadow and Iron)
  • * 50/50 cotton/bamboo batting fill
  • * Straight-line quilted with Aurifil 50wt thread with a walking foot on my Janome 8200 QC

Thanks to my Dad for helping hold the quilt for the photos! :)

Linking up with A Lovely Year of Finishes - I completed my September goal!

Filed under quilt

120,950 notes

bambi-sass:

bettydays:

I have a story.

So my sister got run over by a car once. It was a pretty big deal. Well like a year later she got into a little fender bender and was really bent out of shape about it, so I went and got her a cake. 

image

When I put in my order for the cake, the guy at the bakery asked, “Do you want it to say anything?”

And with a perfectly straight face, I said, “‘Sorry you got hit by a car again.’”

He narrowed his eyes a moment, then nodded and wrote it down, and took it to kitchen to get the writing done.

All the way from the back of the kitchen, I hear a woman shout, “‘Again’?!”

I work in a cake shop and I have to check all orders for delivery before they get sent out, my first shift involved me bringing out a huge 10 inch cake that weighed at least 13 pounds with the words ‘FUCKITY BYE!’ In capitals and attached was a gift message of ‘smell ya later Louise’

(Source: toocooltobehipster, via angels-teslas-and-timelords)

Filed under hehe

39,280 notes

jaybird-gaybird:

Now remember people, National Coming Out Day is on its way. If you “come out” on facebook as straight and/or cis, an ally, a brony, a fucking whovian, or anything other than a marginalized sexual orientation and/or gender identity, I will ram my boot so far up your ass you’ll be tasting Vans for weeks.

(via angels-teslas-and-timelords)

166,879 notes

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

ultrafacts:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

Pretty much yea ^

(via angels-teslas-and-timelords)

Filed under cultures